Starboard Light NYC Premiere

  • Anthology Film Archives 32 2nd Avenue New York, NY, 10003 United States

You're invited to the New York City premiere of Starboard Light, an inspiring documentary spanning five generations, by Brooklyn-based filmmaker Nick Fitzhugh and being distributed on PBS. Nick and the award-winning sound design/mix, producing, editing and coloring team behind the film will be on hand for Q&A following the screening. After that we'll head for beers / snacks at the approriately old and conveniently nearby ale house, McSorley's.

(Note: The $5 ticket fee is being charged only to help cover the cost of the theater rental but as a thank you you'll all get the film as a free gift!)

Sometimes the greatest adventure is the journey home.A love letter to loss spanning five generations, Starboard Light is an inspiring and poignant documentary that shows us how to hold on and asks: does a family make a house? or does a house make a family?

“...beautifully described, beautifully filmed––reminds me of Wordsworth’s definition of poetry as ‘emotion reflected in tranquility.’— George Howe Colt, author of New York Times bestseller The Big House

The film revolves around a middle-class family facing the disappearance of a century of memories when they make the difficult decision to sell their 210 year old summer home on Cape Cod. Whether it’s a small cabin deep in the woods, a primary residence that’s been handed down generation after generation or a waterfront summer getaway, there is a Starboard Lightin many of our lives that we’ve struggled to keep or painfully had to let go. Vicariously through this American family (the filmmaker’s own), Starboard Lightsuggests a way to immortalize the generations of memories and values baked into these shared family homes so that we may pass them on to our own children and grandchildren.

“Oscillating between enchantment and elegy, the film reminds us of the importance of continuity and connection with the past, and affirms the value of ‘old’ things in our disposable culture.— David DiCerto, former film reviewer for the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops